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to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
at rolling stone magazine who grew up in the detroit area returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists and city planners who are reemerging the urban landscape. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you all for coming. i have to say first i am honored that mark asked me to be part of this world trends from ann arbor where we went to college and we are both editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area like i am, but i didn't know his passion to write history and the stories here can that leads to my first question which is what led you to want to write this book? remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it and said i want to write a book about detroit and so do i. but this turned out to be a very different book than most of the others. >> i said that a little tiny bit when i went out to lunch the first time and you were one of the first people, thank you first of all for doing this but i guess i have always been drawn to detroit. i thought for the longest time that it would t
, that is such a poetic occupation. i can't believe nobody's written this. then i got to look and sound of the city had turned down any team than six times by an arsonist. i thought who is this guy? said basically in the true crime writer. that's what i would have to. and then i found out one of these firemen was tom sawyer who told -- i forgot his name, robinson of the call he'd run with first volunteer fire department in california and that was brodrick one. back in new york more tom was a runner, a porch boy coming it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching
magazine" returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists, and city planners who are reimaging the urban landscion. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> i'm thrilled mark asked me to be a part of this. as they said, old friends from ann arbor where we went to college and editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area, like i am, but i didn't know of his intense interest in history and the stories here, and so that leads me to my first question which is what really led you to want to write this book? i remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it, and you said, i want to write a book about detroit. i thought, yeah, well, so does everybody; right? [laughter] this turned out to be a different book than others we red now. >> i sensed that a tiny bit when we got lunch. you were one the first people i talked to about it, and thank you, first of all, for doing this. i guess, i don't know, i've always been drawn to detroit as a topic, and, you know, i thought for the longest time it would be a nove
ways in the first beta of hippies that came to the city really have the drawbridge pulled up on them. many of the kids can get treatment with a drug problems and other medical problems. they were given the cold shoulder by the city officials, the cops harassed them. so that was only the beginning of what became the very first culture were anything great here in san francisco. america's first culture where was the civil work in the disco is of between these new forces, social forces that began sweeping the city in the 1960s and 1970s with gays. one step work really took hold, and became quite bloody. i written about the so-called san francisco values weren't born with flowers in their hair. they were born howling. the book i should say does have a happy ending because the city ultimately trying triads. it resolves these differences after very brutal times and with the help of then mayor who is not terribly beloved in the city at first couldn't win the office because she was a little straightlaced received cisco, diane find time. but she was the kind of calm in hand and stable politica
encyclopedia with amazing injuries kind you really should read it. the city of this that i am on my shelf. this is truly the first hardcover book i ever bought. it's as much love as i can show anything. there is knowing in without dave barry. pat quinn of -- no one made fun of kraft earlier. with that said, without further ado. [applause] >> thank you so much. the onion would never write him back. folks cannot my name is will tracy. this is our new book. 183rd imperial addition. encyclopedia of all the world's knowledge, anything in the world that exists is in this book. anything that is not in the book does not come in fact, exist. so dave's new book is not in this book so it does not, in fact, exist. >> dave barry is not in the buck. dave barry is a figment of our collective imagination. we will come into existence of the power of the mind theater to read this book is, as i said, an encyclopedia. for those are not familiar with the most powerful organization in the world founded in 1756. oppression farmer heard traded sector hands for printing press and founded the mercantile line in na
information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles to work, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> rachel cox, who was robbie cox? >> robbie cox is my deceased uncle who made the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism, and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he we
thought, that is such a poetic thing. the city had burned down 16 times by an arsonist. and i thought, who is this that? so basically i am a true crime writer. and then i found out one of these firemen, it was tom sawyer robinson, i think it is, that he had run with the very first volunteer fire department in california. back in new york where tom was a torch boy, he had been in competition with broderick. when he came west to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw -- heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. and we are very close to it. that tom sawyer actually met him in may of 19 -- 1863. mark twain like to talk to tom because tom knew great stories. all these little little bits and pieces and stories, that is how long it took, 15 years. can you imagine? i do love it. it is so fun. i guess i could read you some now if you would like. this may take a second. i have never read in public before. so i will start with a quote from tom sawyer. here it is. if you want to know how to i
in the 1970s in "season of the witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david drayly looks at 1862 and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." and in "full body burden: growing up in the nuclear shadow of rocky flats," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located near her childhood home. for an extended list of links to various publications' book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or facebook.com/booktv. >> and another update from capitol hill as reporters wait here for word from lawmakerrers in closed-door meetings on the fiscal cliff. an update via twitter from chad pilgrim of fox news, reid's remark that he had made a counteroffer was off-the-cuff response and that there was no counteroffer, and "the washington post" quoting senator joe lieberman saying he'd be shocked if a deal was struck today. we'll bring you continuing updates
to looking and found out the city had burned down in 18 months, please 16 months six times by an arsonist so i thought who is this guy? i got to find out. so i'm a true crime writer and that is what i went after and one of these firemen to, i read an interview, was tom's lawyer who told -- robinson i think was -- that he had run with the very first volunteer fire department in california and that was robert moline. back in new york where tom was a runner, for july, he had been in competition with broderick and when he came west to make his fortune he basically wanted to be a senator. that was his plan and he became a senator and tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the world's ugliest man, heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. i got to write this. as i am working i realize we are very close, tom sawyer actually match mark twain 1863 about three blocks from here, the old building, in a steam room, and mark twain liked to talk to tom. they played cards and drank beer and played dice. that was the genesis of it. this has got to be wr
has a heart and spirit and sold it does much more for our city knowing about you and covenant house i felt very privileged to write the foreword because it would recognize the fact my dad would have been homeless himself. board to a single mother, very poor. and even more so. my dad was po. [laughter] he could not afford the other two letters. [laughter] but through his extraordinary love his family kept him on a trajectory forward. he was able to put first semester's tuition but it is a conspiracy of love makes me to i am today but it starts with the young people. what bothers me is he talks so dramatically in a negative fashion and we don't realize everyone end was of a child to prevent the challenges he faces as an adult. douglas said it is easier to raise strongmen. who i feel the urgency we do not prioritize our children as much as we should. >> you say the labor party is the forward. it is so from the heart and this week you are engaged in the snap challenge? >> i was up late with my girlfriend on twitter. [laughter] when will our mayor get a life? it was a sunday night going ba
people. can you talk a little bit about how that works in a city? >> yeah. well, first of all, i've had lots of conversations with people who, quote-unquote, have made it, and when they were in tough times from famous people like tyler perry who was homeless, living in a car, to people i know throughout my community who have got, broken drug addictions, who have dealt with brutal, brutal hatred because they came out of the closet at a young age. all these stories. and it's amazing to me that everybody, including tyler perry, has these stories about how one perp's small act of -- one person's small act of kindness was a difference maker for them. and it gives me chills to think that the biggest thing we actually do on any given day probably could be a small act of kindness to someone else. and so the vulnerability and fragility of life you really get to see up close and personal in cities like ours here in new york and ours in newark, new jersey, and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for a kid. and i see, and i was very happy during sandy, we were able to do some things th
and join the peace corps, volunteered in the inner city or in outer space because he asked them to give back to this country that has given us all so much. generation inspired has passed that commitment on to their children and grandchildren in the continuity of spirit that continues to work for a more just and peaceful world. as we approached the 50th anniversary, my family thought a good deal about how to best celebrate my father service and patriotism. we recognize that his time is becoming part of history. not living memory. that brings opportunities as well as challenges. both my parents loved history and and they pass it on to me to my brother, john. my father read voraciously about the civil war, english parliamentary history and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy adm
of poetry. [laughter] we do have differences. i am from kansas city which during my childhood was known in as the gateway to the west. he was from st. louis and the government builds the arch okhotsk and proclaimed themselves gateway to the west and we called them mound city. we think of st. louis as the exit to the east of. [laughter] there's similarities between t.s. eliot and me. we both use foreign languages in our poetry. he tends to use more sanskrit. actually don't know much of it. i was a kid who'd got dreamy during sanskrit class in kansas city, missouri. [laughter] to look out the window. i use some yiddish. [laughter] it is fair to say that t.s. eliot was not partial to yiddish. my shortest poem uses yiddish. it was called something like this societal political and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. the title does not count. the plan was o.j. or a vague [laughter] -o.j. oi vey and then -- we both use a little german when george w. bush appointed a retainer that rhymed roberto gonzales. we both cried about animals and he famously wrote a lot of things abou
[applause] >> i am pleased to announce the city of albany have the honor of hosting the time warner cable c-span local content vehicle cities for. this program travels the country to capital cities, teaching the history of literary life of these communities. albany was chosen because we are a city of rich history and an interesting local literary community. .. >> find the best writers that we can and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world to a particular place, and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that that have such a rer flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. so we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the, to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or maybe 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany t
of the main part of the cities. >> professor haddad, who are some of the players that we might not have heard of thomas some of the large business leaders in syria? and what role are they playing in the current crisis in serious? >> well if you know, the conquest -- probably a different trajectory at some level, especially after the first few months. it became a totally different kind of thing. it started out as resentment and rebellion against -- >> economic resentment? >> it was makes. it was really problematic to look at the arab uprising and pin it down on one thing because we were talking about several decades of a particular kind of system that was politically inefficient and definitely undemocratic. so economically efficient early on, they're gone but then actually declined and became quite problematic in terms of gaps between the haves and the have-nots. but all of these systems, all of these reasons combined together to create a readiness to act. and the assad regime, they don't act unless there might be a positive outcome but at least not -- [inaudible]. when that movement took plac
the security forces in the city, and under operation clean up to, quote, clean up the city, and what that means, really is it means whatever the security forces would like it to mean. in the two-year period it's in effect, some 3,000 men are murdered, and in what we call police encounters, which is, you know, a flagrant abuse of language because encounter is what happens when you run into a friend on the road or a book you thought you lost. these are murders. her, herself, and the government not only condone, celebrate, but allow the murders to take place. when my father is killedded, he is one of thousands. the police now have set up squads. they have assassination squads, torture squads. the city is on fire. he's coming home at night from a public meeting he's addressed on the outskirts of the city, and as he reaches cliffton road, the cars, there's 70-100 policemen on the road that night. some of them are in positions in the trees. the street lights have all been turned off. the road we livedded on, some of you who know the city, is one of those difficult neighborhoods with a british high co
. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director and we had done a lot of work when trying to expand affordable health options. i said this is a great thing. we could not only raise levels of compassion and understanding and dispel that stereotypes about snap and things that are on snap and focusing ted -- focus instead on changes week could be making an t mobile level to address food and security and nutrition and expand more healthy options. that is what we are doing this week. we also have to think of our society as a whole. and security guards in my office, we were talking with them because some of them were making $7 and change and many working overtime to make more money to solve problems like snap, we are allowing many of our employees especially behind the curtains. the curtains blocked the sex and love section. it is like in 711, the line across the magazine's. you guys should put your book on the second aisle. >> we should have called it 50 shades of homelessness. >> it would have sol
producers traveled the area as we explore the livery seen in new york's capital city and surrounding towns. .. >> and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we in saratoga. >> my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can ask and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world the a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or probably 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany to most recently a south african writer, and
anymore that we thought it had. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles tour go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now on booktv robert sullivan presents a history of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don
was the perfect choice because it is arguably the most populated city in syria, it is in northern syria. there is a local part of the city, the countryside as well. the countryside and the city make up the government -- [inaudible] of syria. all of the perl -- the 70% of the cities have been stripped away. the first enacted in the cities is i was hosted by veteran prerevolutionary [inaudible] , that is eerie and citizens going to get it to do what they can. the first thing we did it to her. most of the shops were closed down. to be honest with you, -- by the way, i am using aleppo is a case in point. to be honest, i thought that i would need -- [inaudible] we were very le we were very lesson and surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more sophisticated than i thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a phd, doctor [inaudible name]. they also started the committee on the local administration and the committee on finance making sure that every penny is accounted for. we are working on a number of projects to stabilize the city and help our tra
urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the conviction. for thousands of those. now, there were cards in the wheel compared to the giant financial institutions or running them. but it was that integration into the financial system which is part of the question you asked about unions. but it is only unions. in a sense, you know, we need to understand a very volatile time. >> we might want to open up to the audience. >> hi. i am with the union. talk about a systematic change. that they do. [inaudible] how would that happen politically? they don't call the pres
that would form long-term partnerships with cities, rural areas, underserved communities. really political offices. that was a huge cultural change that had not existed. notwithstanding the rhetoric and the noble sounding goals, this trillion dollar down payment on transforming housing finance by showing america new way home, the book that jim johnson wrote was really an effort to do a much more straightforward and monday and objective. stop any unwanted and unwelcome changes to charter eye-catching the regulator, congress, and give copious amounts of affordable housing that would've published a. it all worked until the charter was changed on june 30, 2008, a mere weeks before their collapse. the same time, step two, a national homeownership strategy which brought in the rest of the lenders, and it literally brought everybody in the whole mortgage finance field into the fold. and created a partnership to accomplish financing more affordable and flexible indoor to increase homeownership opportunity. what happened, and you have the charts, anyone into competition with fha, down payments with
is like and what and ipad is like. they are also building more cities than anybody else, going from 75 cities of 1 million people to two 20 cities of 1 million people to almost 20 cities of ten million people and in doing that they will be building our highways and power plants of tomorrow and the czech writer has a lot of power in what these look like so they will be dictating what those things look like as well and as they create vast reserves of wealth and giving it to people who need to borrow it europeans who need to borrow it gain influence that way and when they go to latin america where they are the number one trading partner investor in brazil or africa where they are number one investor they get a lot of influence that way. is not just economic growth but economic leverage and economic power. they are growing as a soft power leader in the world and that is something we need to watch carefully because their interests do not always a line which hours. >> host: next call from maurice in walton, ky. >> caller: hello. >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: i would like to ask mr. ro
are an economic engine of innovation for the cities, the region, for the country and world. >> host: by the way, is this the original location, where we are in the university center area? >> guest: we are in university city in west philadelphia. penn originally started in what was then a very small downtown city of philadelphia and ten moves to west philadelphia, and what we call university city which we have helped make into a very vibrant arts and culture and economic hub. >> host: here's the book. s conspiracy of compromise by governing demanding it, and campaigns underminds it. amy and dennis the co-authors. this is "booktv" on c-span 2. >> host: on your screen is a photograph taken in 1942, buffalo, new york, university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> guest: at a woman who committed suicide at the hotel in buffalo during that year, and a photographer happened to be passing by and took the picture that appeared in "life" at the time and one widely acclaimed award for having been able to catch the moment at the pern's death, at the moment in which the person was about t
heated thing after the troops captured mexico city on september 14th 1847, and here's an image of scott entering mexico city. if you look at the lower left-hand corner, you concede someone picking a barack in preparing to throw at the american troops. this is an immense that expresses the extreme hostility of many people in mexico city to having their city occupied by american troops. initially americans are extremely enthusiastic about the fact that their army had conquered the capital of another country, but when mexicans still refuse to come to terms and in the peace treaty, what began was very bleak occupation that ended up being terrible for the army in terrible for the pro-war movement generally. winfield scott's troops were suggested to daily -- subjected to daily guerrilla warfare, and there was no end in sight because mexico refused to get up at the same time a lot of expansionists in the united states, once the united states captured mexico city argues that maybe the u.s. should annex all of mexico. if you already conquered the capitol city, one that take all, and it is at tha
later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered with long white gloves with ostrich feathers, it hetty was introduced to the prince of wales. and she said
inskeep, co-host of morning edition on npr and the author of this book, his first book, "instant city: life and death in catchy." karachi." steve inskeep, what happened in karachi on december 20, 2000? >> i'll let you and thanks by the way for the invitation and what for you guys are doing. on december 20, 2009 there was a religious procession in the middle of this gigantic mega- city, one of the rapidly growing megacities in the world that was bomb. it's a tragic story but when you begin digging into the details of that single day, peeling back the layers, what i discovered was the star that to me a loom and it's the way the world is developing, the way the world is going. the way that different kinds of people are coming together in cities, sometimes quite violently, and thrashing out our future. this is an event i learned about that became this book. now, how many people were killed, who bombed to? >> about three dozen people. saying precisely who bombed who is challenging, but in the end it turned out to be am at least according to the authorities, a militant group which is why ma
, and that is significant because it really does show and it really brings the city as a part of the throat and it really does give some relief is he telling you will see on the atlanta falcons, you see the skyline on the top of the city, that is really nice and atlanta falcons, speaking of the skyline, these guys right here, setting the stage in setting themselves up to a run at the big game towards the end of the season. >>guest: i have to make sure you see the back of this because this is the sure the experience, this is the warm cozy wrapped itself around at the first quarter of the first game and still be wrapped around it at the end of sunday night football. they're so soft, so incredibly comfortable and that is why so many people pick them up to give to their kids come grandkids, for bed so far, you cannot go wrong with this as a gift and if you do have people and of life you know who are fans the different teams come to take advantage of by more and save.it is one of the first items that we offer here, with football fan shop, this goes out each year in and each one is different and unique but
friend of mine was walking on burke avenue in new york city and he passed a blind man who was assigned the good please help me i'm blind. my friend is kind of walked by them and, but then he stopped and he saw this guy only had a couple coins in his hat was so he dropped in a couple of quarters and then he asked the man permission to just change the story a little bit for this guy, which he did and later in the afternoon he came back and pass the guy again and the hut was full of coins of those and he stopped and talked to the guy in a blind man admitted have never had a day quite like this. you have to tell me what she wrote. how did you change my story? and my friend said i just added a couple of words and error please help me i'm blind and it's spring. it just change the whole story for the guy. we all have a story. maybe a couple stories people use to describe those. our families have a story about who we are to them and usually are often they involve a nickname we don't particularly care for. my father used to call me skippy. i have no idea why to this day. do we have many kids he
all british ships. adams then wrote to political leaders in other coastal cities. he was absolutely filled with a sense of power, and he wanted to gain more. he convinced political leaders and other cities to follow suit. he soon sent harbor fronts up and down the coast a roaring riot and gained a national representation as a great revolutionary leader. merchants, meanwhile, stopped importing british goods. within months, british manufacturers and exporters absorbed huge financial losses. british trade fell by 50%. the british merchants, the british exporters demanded that parliament repeal the stamp tax in america to restore trade relations. in 1765, parliament did just that and turned sam adams and james ottis into heros in boston and elsewhere in america. just who were the heros? well, both were from wealthy families, and, like, many sons of wealthy new englanders, they were harvard graduates. we all make mistakes. [laughter] if they had gone to yale, they would have behaved themselves, gone out and gotten decent jobs. [laughter] adams was the son of boston's largest brewer. you
he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in english, french, and creole. it's generational. we talk about the people who were surviving it. we talk about their friends and neighbors. there is an opportunity for people who don't know much about haiti to get to know katie through a variety of women writers wasted. >> host: is creole very different from french? >> guest: creel -- creole is a language of its own. it came from the french, spanish, english, all of these people came to haiti. and so creole is a very beautiful language. it is often maligned langua
and to read and encounter her and i suppose love her. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicle's for go to c-span.org/localcontent. with a month left in 2012 many publications are putting together a third year end list of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction elections. these nonfiction titles were included in the new york times 100 notable books of 2012. and barack obama:the story david maraniss, associate editor of the washington post present a history of president barack obama's family. charles murray of the american enterprise institute argues a growing divide between the upper and lower class goes beyond economics differences in coming apart:the state of white america 1960-2010. in victory, the triumphant game revolution, linda hirschman presenting history of the gay-rights movement. david nassau chronicles the life and career of the father of the kennedy political dynasty in the patriarch, remarkable life and turbulent times of joseph kennedy. history professor at duke university examined haiti from i
you couldn't carry a gun around in the town like dodge city is a good example. there were walls against that. if you are a cowboy that came in when you were supposed to go story or pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way that most people think about it. >> guest: this is of course settlements out in the wild prairie, but they are like towns everywhere today. you need to call and order in the towns and it's hard to keep that up. >> host: even the shootout at the corral was a starting point. >> guest: clams and i think it was had been arrested or accused of violating below will ordinance and forbade carrying a local firearm. incidentally the understanding of what gun rights were for beginning to evolve in the 19th century, and in particular in the south in the early 19th century it was a big problem with duals the most famous one is aaron burr and hamilton, but this was fairly common but it was frowned upon and it can be prosecuted and he had to keep moving around to avoid being prosecuted, so but one of the names of people who insisted on the spot started to
. >> there's $750 billion of waste in health care annually. bruce brussard recently spoke to the city club of cleveland about health care, insurance, and medicare. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, welcome to the city club of cleveland. i'm president of the city club's burped of directors. i'm delighted to introduce to you the president and effective january 1, ceo, of humana inc, a phenomenonture 100 health care and health insurance provider and administrator serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the recent election, at the center of the policy debate with implications beyond the health care industry impacting the largest fiscal pom aand larger concerns. fortunate to have with us him here to share insights on the industry and the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive, and before that, u.s. oncology, large producers and providers of health care products to to major health care institutions. with that background, he brings to the podium today a broad perspective on health care issues facing the country. he holds the undergraduate de
on the city of goma, the people of north seventh street and citizens everywhere wonder when the storm has passed our rebels before the superstar. either way, tell tell signs in history indicate that the conflict will continue unless appropriate deterring measures are taken. m23 at its precursor exposed congo as a dysfunctional state but we put up a leadership and lacking a combatant army and security institutions. but the feeling of the state, all community grievances, demographic, ethnic expansion and control of resources has turned eastern congo into a tinderbox. this means ambitious ashburn in recent demagogues only need to cause and find a sponsor can be a communitycome the business can the political state to start the militia. m23, primarily Étude d. mono ethnic armed group fighting discrimination is one reason for the rebellion. they failed to generate important political communities such as the onion malindi who have so far refused to join m23. instead, serving the drc army and fighting the rebellion. the rebellion had also tried to take over goma can deliver to the drc. it is whe
is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to discover -- discover that the cockpit, it's the kind of -- i mean you don't mention it in the book. but now we know that? added that escaped us? did you start out knowing that new jersey to markets see the entire revolution. >> someone reminded me, we lived in oregon for a lot of the 90's to my family. before i went to oregon i used to go have lunch all the time. i remember this now. i was very happy after i wrote the book. a bunch of guys who work toward guides gave me free passes to the top of the empire. and that was great. we spent lunch attack. kind of obvious, but it's a great view. and so -- >> really? >> really. really great deal. i just remember, remember as a kid reading about lincoln and and saying, you know, this was where it all happened. i know, and he was trying to get votes in new jersey. but he kept saying, i kno
. this came up against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> guest: cases from the federal territories had come in the 19th century via, especially utah, questions of polygamy, but from the states, the really major cases made it to the supreme court in the late 1930s and early 1940s, really, that new deal era, and they tended not so much to be the salvation army, but the johova witnesses that caused trouble. >> host: what was one of the cases, walk us through. >> guest: an interesting case called cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gon
or -- >> guest: dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to deposit your arms. if you were a cowboy who came in from the plains there was place where you were supposed to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that didn't fit with the way most people think about it. >> guest: this is in settlements. knotted out in the wild prairie. but they're like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in towns and it's hard to keep that up if erv is pull ought a pistol. >> host: even the shootout at the okay corral was gun control. >> guest: it started because of ike had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that forbids carrying a firearm openly around town. >> host: incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for began to evolve in the 19th century in particular in the south. in the earl 19th century there was a big problem with duels. duels between gentlemen, obviously the most famous one is aaron burr and alexander hamilton. but this is dueling was fairly common, about it was frowned upon, and could be prosecuted, and had to ke
, there is the third key question as well which is christians, the christians and the city's of levittown build societies together? and the kurds and sinise? it will be at the question. this is the questions of how different sex and religious treatises relate to each other, one of the central questions of the 21st century. that is one of the reasons we need a really robust field of interfaith cooperation helping to make vague the bridge of cooperation rather than a barrier of division or bomb of destruction. how do we do this well. you can see this as a robust discourse within the field of education reform or poverty alleviation or in car rentals and bill read is not about doing it. it's about doing it well. part of what we have done is look through the social science research of the last ten years and religious diversity whether it is work by robert putnam at harvard or princeton or pew and galloped and brown and all the social science research and ask the question of effectiveness. what does this teach us? and what you come up with is a very simple model called the interfaith triangle. we kno
captured mexico city in september for team, 1847. here's an image of scott entered mexico city. if you look at the lower left-hand image you can see at eon picking iraq and preparing to throw out the american troops. an image that expresses extreme hostility of many people in mexico city to have in their city occupied by american troops. initially as you can imagine americans are extremely louisiana state that their army had conquered the capital of another country. but when mexicans refused to come to terms in any peace treaty, what began with a period of cometh very bleak occupation that ended up being terrible for the army and terrible for the pro-war movement generally. winfield scott's troops were suggested to daily guerrilla warfare by mexican part enforces and there was really no end to the war because mexico still refused to give up. at the same time come expansionists in the united states once the unit is captured mexico city began to argue the u.s. should annex all of mexico. if you've are to conquer the capital city, why not take it out. it's at this point the people around the c
fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcolm kerr. >> was he targeted? >> because he was an american. not only american, but very visible presence in the middle east. there is no more high-profile example of america's involvement in the region in the presence of uav. >> this american university put in beirut on purpose? back in 1850s, what was beirut like? >>
a political battle we fought out but it's an urban area or city in the frontier trying to get its act together? >> guest: oddly, courts didn't have much to say except in state courts were for the most part are we going baystate and lower federal courts supported the right and saw it as not a rate that belonged to criminals are to be used for criminal purposes, but more as a write-in connection to civic duty. but the supreme court didn't say anything about the second amendment for about a century. they mentioned it briefly in a ruling in 1876 and that was u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said
of innovation for our city, for our region, and for the country in the world. >> is this the original location, where we are? >> no. we are in university city in west philadelphia. pan originally started in what was then a very small downtown city of philadelphia, and been moved to west philadelphia and will we call university city which we have helped make into a very vibrant arts and culture and economic hub. >> and once again, here is the book. it is the spirit of compromise, governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. this is book tv on c-span2. >> every weekend book tv authors -- offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> on your screen is a photograph taken in 1942. buffalo, new york. university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> via looking at a woman who committed suicide out of a hotel in buffalo during the year, and a photographer happen to be passing by and took the picture. the picture appeared in life at the time and one widely acclaimed awards for having been able to capture the moment as the per
in a town like dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to depart with your arms. if you with a cowboy coming in from the plains, there was a place to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way people think about it. >> guest: no. this is, of course, in settlements, not in the wild prairie, but, you know, they were like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in town, and that's hard to keep up with everyone has a pistol. >> host: a shootout at okay corral. >> guest: it started because they had a firearm carried around town, and incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for start in the 19th century and particularly, in the south. in the early 19th century, there was a big problem with duals between gentlemen, obviously, the most famous is aaron burr and alexander hamilton, but dueling was popular, but frowned upon and could be prosecuted. burr had to move around to avoid being prosecuted. >> host: vice president burr actually. >> guest: was a vice president. but one of the means that people who insisted
north as delaware city in newcastle. roads and bridges in various parts of our state have been damaged and will need to be repaired or replaced. meanwhile we continue to work at fema and other agencies to determine the full extent of damage. delaware and its local jurisdictions contribute a large amount of resources and a short period of time to prepare for and respond to the storm and to begin rebuilding and its weight. eliminate damage assessment show more will be required and given already state budget we need help in filling the gaps as much as the gulf coast states needed. madam chair, and i just want to say thanks for the chance to share some of these with you today and let you know about the impacts. in delaware we have a long tradition of helping our neighbors, whether they live down the street are well beyond our borders. for years we've helped other sister state suffered from disasters be they hurricanes, tornadoes, floods or wildfires. today, the shoe is on the other foot. we need to help our neighbors, not just in delaware, but all across the country. just as we've been the
. they combined to mark martin vicksburg but it was clear that the city, the batteries could not be taken without support of army troops. and general halleck who was the army commander of the theater, i like to call him general can't be done, told farragut asked if he could spare some of his 100,000 troops to help a railroad junction, to capture vicksburg. and how it said can't be done. don't have enough troops. and the level of the river was dropping so much, the union naval forces and the army troops were there, only 3000, were all getting sick. so the union forces actually gave up the effort to capture vicksburg in the summer of 1862 because the navy would help them do. which came somewhat as a surprise to note in public because the flotilla at that time, the navy had been doing a lot of things all by itself without any army support. they've captured -- they captured of port royal bay in november 1861. all without any army support at all. but clearly that run of success was going to come to an end. the confederates have now figured out some ways to carry the war to the union forces itself. the
of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly set the stage. i don't need to tell anyone who is in this room about the depth of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read very briefly from the report that the u.p. report filed for the u.n.gen assembly when it was highlight, quote, pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights act
's capital city albany today at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span2 -- un c-span3. >> up next beatrix hoffman presented history of the american health-care system. she presents her thoughts on why the united states has been one of the few developed countries to not adopt universal health care. and examines why the issue is so divisive. this is just under an hour. >> hello, everyone. i am gayle davis, provost and vice president of academic student affairs and former faculty member of women's studies of women's history. i am delighted to be here and happy that we are sponsoring this program. thank you to all of you and thank you for the nice introduction. it is really going to be the best of all pleasures to introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person
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